What’s In Season: November

November seems to be the forgotten month. Tucked in between Halloween and the holiday celebrations of December, is a month full of cold and rain as the temperature drops and we change our clocks back an hour. No wonder people like to forget it exists.

97th Street GreenMarket November 30, 2012 CLS_6188

Photo: Charles Smith

However, it is a month full of fruits and vegetables that are in season, bursting with flavor and tasting their very best. According to the BC Association of Farmer’s Market these are the fruits and vegetables currently in season in the month of November.

Apples

Apple Basket

Apples, full of Vitamin C and dietary fiber, are at their height in the fall. There are more than 7,500 different apple varieties with some better for baking, others better for turning into sauces and others simply enjoyed on their own. Previously we did a taste test and found our favorite variety for eating. You can use apples in your day to day cooking as well. Apples can be turned into sauce, butter or jelly, baked into sweet treats like muffins and pies, added to salads, or turned into a drink.

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Brussel Sprouts

9. Many

Photo: AnneCN

For many, spotting these cruciferous vegetables on the table means running the opposite direction, but they are full of vitamins and nutrients. While roasting them is best, you can also steam, boil, and sauté them. The key? Don’t overcook them!

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Cabbage

Cabbage

This humble vegetable is really good for you. Cabbage is very low in fat and calories, but is high in dietary fiber and contains nutrients like vitamin C and K. To take full advantage of its nutrients, it is best to cook it minimally and not cook out its benefits.

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Carrots

Carrots

With over 100 species of carrots in a variety of colors ranging from white to purple, carrots are rich in vitamin A and beta-carotene. Like many other vegetables on this list, it is low in calories but high in nutrients. Eat them raw, cooked or juiced, they’re healthy and delicious either way.

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Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Photo: Nick Saltmarsh

Cauliflower is a good source of vitamin C and dietary fiber. Cauliflower is a versatile vegetable with many uses. You can roast, mash or steam it or turn it into a pizza crust, sauce or rice. You could also eat it raw or pickled.

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Leeks

Preparing the food

Photo: Oxfordian

A relative of the onion family, and available year round, leeks peak in the winter. Leeks are a good source of iron, vitamin C and folate. They’re often interchangeable with onions and garlic, but more and more people are enjoying them for their own flavor. It is a common ingredient in soups, used to make stock or can be served as a side dish.

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Pears

Pear Still Life [291/366]

Photo: Tim Sackton

Pears are often forgotten in favor of apples in the fall, but they’re just as delicious and nutritious for you. Pears, when eaten with their skin, is rich in dietary fiber and has higher pectin levels than apples, making them effective in lowering cholesterol levels. Like apples, you can use pears in sauces, baking and in salads. Or you could enjoy it them on their own as a juicy and healthy snack. In fact, try substituting a pear into your favorite apple recipe for a new twist on an old favorite.

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Turnips

First Root Farm CSA Second Pickup #3

Photo: Tim Sackton

Turnips are a versatile vegetable since you can eat both the root and the leafy greens. Both are rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium and dietary fiber. The root can be eaten raw if the bulb is young, but usually it is cooked. Turnips are often found roasted, mashed, in soups or served as a side dish.

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What are your favorite fall vegetables? How do you like to cook them?

References:

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/
http://www.freshforkids.com.au/index.html
http://www.whfoods.com/index.php

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